Feng Shui and the Art of Leaving—The Yin Aspect of Moving

Before you leave, be sure to clean the windows thoroughly.

The future is yang and the past is yin. What is new (for you) is yang and what is old is yin. When a person moves to a different home, the future home is usually what is emphasized. That’s understandable, but the future is built upon the past, so it’s important to give proper consideration to the old home that is being left behind. The basic rule is to always leave a place nicer than when you moved in. That will make it much more likely that the next place you move to will feel like an improvement.

Leave in place any hidden feng shui cures such as tiny mirrors, because (if they stay in place) they will benefit the future resident. But the main thing about leaving is to clean the old home thoroughly—and I mean thoroughly. This is not just politeness; it’s a way to insure that the new home will be satisfactory. Leaving and arriving are like the yin and yang sides of the same coin. If the yin part is done well, the yang part will fall into place nicely.

Here I am installing a tiny mirror as a feng shui cure. It’s exposed, so remove it when leaving. If you are selling a home, never leave obviously oddball things around. They say to potential buyers, “Something is wrong here.” Renters should probably remove visible cures in order to get their full deposit back.

Here I am installing a tiny mirror as a feng shui cure. It’s exposed, so remove it when leaving. If you are selling a home, never leave obviously oddball things around. They say to potential buyers, “Something is wrong here.” Renters should probably remove visible cures in order to get their full deposit back.

I have no intention of ever moving from our Kona home, but I’ve moved many times in my life. My mother told me that she moved a good bit while she was pregnant with me, and that is considered to be an indicator that the offspring will move around a lot. Even before I practiced feng shui, I intuitively knew that it was right to clean the old home—not just for the deposit, and not just for the good karma—but because it felt right to do that to a place that had sheltered me.

Once you’ve left the old home and are arriving at the new home, introduce yourself (full name) three times, and also express verbal gratitude in whatever way feels appropriate to you. If a name comes to you intuitively as the name of the home, feel free to use that name when referring to your home. I recommend Carole Hyder’s excellent book Conversations With Your Home for anyone who is moving (and also for those who are staying put, like me).

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