Feng Shui & Holiday Decor

By Daderot (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

This is an apsara, a Hindu or Buddhist spirit, similar to what Western cultures might call an angel. It has no Christmas association whatsoever and thus can be displayed year-round. Photo by Daderot, via Wikimedia Commons.

Decoration for holidays that occur near the end of the year, such as Christmas & New Years, should not be on display in homes before December 1 nor after January 15—end of story as far as feng shui’s concerned. Don’t I wish!

How often I’ve had to explain to people that their Christmas angel (or Christmas angel collection) shouldn’t be on display in July! They’ll say, “Oh, it’s not a Christmas angel. It’s just an angel.”

By World Journalist (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This nativity angel painted by crèche artist Bill Egan is one of those that someone might try to justify as “just an angel.” It’s not. Photo by World Journalist, via Wikimedia Commons.

Unless you can identify the angel as a particular angel with their own Old Testament name (such as St. Michael), it’s probably a Christmas angel. An exception is a guardian angel picture (with children included) for a child’s room.

Angels from non-Western cultures are fine any time of year because they are never associated with Christmas.

Items associated with a long-past holiday hold you back in the past and stymie your progress with future projects. The items are not a problem if they are put away in a box that’s labeled. Just don’t keep any holiday items on display beyond about two weeks past the holiday. That’s any holiday, any time of year.

Photo by www.personalcreations.com.

Live or faux greenery (that’s actually green, not dried) is suitable for all times of the year, and looks particularly nice during the Christmas season. Photo by www.personalcreations.com.

The good news is that fresh evergreen plant material, which is so appropriate this time of year, is fine in feng shui. The only plant material that is a problem in feng shui is old dried plants and flowers—like lei or wedding bouquets. If you are keeping them for sentimental reasons, box them and label the box.

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